Tag Archives: animal kingdom

The Strongest and Most Misunderstood Creature in the World (Video)

When you think of strength in the animal kingdom, it’s natural to think of some of the massive majestic creatures we’re all so familiar with: lions, elephant, grizzlies, rhinos, hippos…

These animals are definitely powerful, but when you examine pound-for-pound strength, you quickly realize that it’s the smallest creatures who are really the most impressive lifters.

Take the leafcutter ant, for instance. These ants cut off and carry leaf segments that are sometimes up to 50 times heavier than they are.

Leafcutter ants march across the forest floor. Click to enlarge

But even the leafcutter ant is no match for the dung beetle when it comes to true strength.

Though their appetite for dung has given them a bit of a bad name in our society today, dung beetles (also known as scarabs) were actually worshipped in ancient Egypt.

An eagle-winged scarab beetle on the door to the Edfu temple in Egypt. Click to enlarge

The ancient Egyptians believed that the sun was rolled across the sky every day by a giant scarab god.

Dung beetles may not actually be gods, but they definitely have superhuman strength. The insects are able to drag dung balls up to 1,140 times their body weight- the equivalent of an average human pulling six double deckers buses full of passengers.

But there’s more to dung beetles than just eating poop.

For example, they’re actually pretty good parents. Dung beetles are one of only a few groups of insects that has been shown to actively care for their offspring. There is even a monogamous species of dung beetle that mates for life.

Even more interesting is the dung beetle’s navigation system. After rolling a fresh poop ball, the beetles will climb on top of it and dance around, orienting itself.

Scientists theorized that the beetles were actually using the Milky Way to orient themselves and navigate.

One of the dung beetles used in the Milky Way navigation testing. Click to enlarge

They tested this theory on one species of African dung beetle by putting little hats over them that covered their eyes.

The beetles still perched atop their poop balls to try and orient themselves, but only were able to wander around aimlessly without being able to see the stars, proving that they were using the heavens to navigate.

So give the dung beetle some credit- they’re probably much more intelligent and complex than you ever imagined.

To learn more about dung beetles, check out these 10 Fascinating Facts About Dung Beetles from About.com.

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The World’s Fastest Animals, In Super Slow Motion (Video)

When you think of the fastest animals in the world, you probably don’t think of salamanders or crabs. Surprisingly however, these two unassuming creatures top the list of the world’s fastest animals.

Both share the ability to make lightning-fast movements with different parts of their body. The hydromantes salamander takes the top spot with the animals kingdom’s fastest tongue, and the mantis crab comes in second with a hammer claw that moves so fast it actually creates a compression wave that boils water in front of it.

Check out the video below to see these two amazing creatures in action:

For everyone who came here to see a cheetah in super slow-motion, don’t worry, I got you- watching cheetah videos has been a favorite activity of mine since I was a kid.

Cheetahs, the fastest land animals on our planet, are capable of reaching speeds up to 75 mph. When chasing prey at these extremely high speeds, cheetahs use their tails as a rudder to help steer:

The peregrine falcon is the world’s fastest bird, and the fastest animal if we’re talking about moving the whole body.

These fighter-pilot like falcons assault their prey (almost exclusively other birds) from above, reaching a terminal velocity of 200 mph as they dive-bomb from sky (terminal velocity is the point at which air resistance stops an object from accelerating during free fall).

The falcons strike with a clenched fist which either stuns or kills their prey. The falcon then twists in midair to snare the other bird.

Breathtaking Photos Use Yoga to Inspire Conservation Efforts for the Manta Ray

Yogi and Prana ambassador Amy Ippoliti is seen in the above photo meditating in the Caribbean water with a 1,500 pound manta ray.

Why would she do this you ask? Well besides doing it just for the sake of having a really cool picture, Amy’s goal is to help encourage conservation efforts for the manta ray by reminding people of the, “interspecies connection that man and animal share”.

According to Johnie Gall from GrindTV.com,

“Manta rays are harvested globally in unsustainable numbers by organized fishing programs; fishermen are after their gill rakers (the rays use these to gather food), which are in high demand in China for their medicinal properties despite the fact that there is no proof they can cure anything at all.”

Photographer Taro Smith is the guy behind this project. Taro recruited Amy Ippoliti to be the face for this campaign, knowing that she had respect in the yoga world and would represent the concept they had in mind.

Smith has also worked with famous underwater dancer Hannah Fraser

The idea of the photo was to show how peaceful, gentle, and beautiful the manta ray really are so viewers will join and support in conservation efforts for them.

Taro Smith believes sometimes you should use…

“shock journalism to initiate change”

Taro Smith has had experience in similar types of campaigns. Previously Taro did a project to help build awareness on shark depopulation as a result of fishing. The manta ray’s situation is similar: overfishing is putting their population at risk.

Hopefully this photo will help build awareness, it is pretty awesome. Check out the full story from GrindTV here.