Tag Archives: art

Using Abstract Shapes to Capture the Motion of Legendary Olympians (Video)

Felix Deimann, a young motion artist from Dortmund, Germany, has always been fascinated with the dynamics of motion.

So for his final college thesis project, he decided to use digital graphics and abstract shapes to capture some of the most iconic athletes from the history of the Olympic Games.

His subjects: Nadia Comăneci, the first gymnast to ever earn a perfect 10, Michael Phelps, the most decorated Olympian ever, the legendary U.S. basketball Dream Team that dominated the ’92 games in Barcelona, and Usain Bolt, who still holds the title of the fastest man ever.

He named the project “Citius, Altius, Fortius”, after the ancient Olympic motto meaning “Faster, Higher, Stronger”.

This isn’t Felix’s first time creating awesome motion art, however.

In 2013, while still in college, he did another student project called “In Vitro”, in which he captures the earliest phases of life creation within the human body:

Felix also does some static art. Check out some of his work in the images below (click an image to enlarge):

 

You can check out more of Felix’s work on his website here.

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Mesmerizing Visualization Shows the Spread of Western Culture Over the Past 2,000 Years (Video)

Dr. Maximilian Schich is a professor of art and technology at the University of Texas at Dallas. His current research focuses on how the spread of the arts and sciences affected the spread of culture.

To illustrate this process, he decided to map the movements of 100,000 of the most influential figures of western culture from the past 2,000 years.

Among the names were people like Apple founder Steve Jobs, Pride and Prejudice author Jane Austen, and the famous artist and inventor Leonardo da Vinci.

Schich gathered information about the birth and death places of all these great figures, and plotted it on an interactive map. Being able to actually see culture as it spreads over time is a truly fascinating experience:

(h/t Quartz)

This Polish Street Artist Creates Captivating Lace-Inspired “Public Jewelry” (Photo Gallery)

NeSpoon Polska isn’t just your every day spray-paint graffiti artist. The female street artist from Warsaw, Poland has her own unique brand of art that incorporates lace patterns.

She uses stencils, ceramics, paints and sometimes even actual crocheted webbing to create her amazing street art masterpieces, and everything is a potential canvas.

She refers to her art as “public jewelry”.

Check out some of her work in the images below. Click an image to enlarge:

You can check out more of NeSpoon’s work on her Behance profile.

(h/t This is Collossal)

This Man Is Able to Reproduce Meticulously Accurate Cityscapes After A Single Fly-Over (Video)

They call him the human camera.

Stephen Wiltshire was born in London in 1974. As a child, Stephen was a mute. At the age of three he was diagnosed as autistic, and in that same year his father died in a motorcycle accident.

At five he was sent to the Queensmill School for the autistic in London. The instructors there discovered that Stephen had an intense passion for art. Even as a child, his skill and attention to detail was exceptional.

A drawing Stephen did of St. Paul’s Cathedral when he was 9. Click to enlarge (Courtesy of the Stephen Wiltshire Gallery)

They used this passion to help teach him to talk. Stephen was a mute, and avoided communication with others as much as possible.

So his instructors at Queensmill would take away his art supplies when he wasn’t using them so that he was forced to communicate with them when he wanted to draw again. He started with just sounds, but eventually he said his first word: “paper”.

He learned to speak fully at the age of nine. By that time, his passion for art was already extremely developed. His favorite subjects were American cars (he’s said to have an encyclopedic knowledge of them) and the buildings of London.

A young Stephen Wiltshire thoroughly enjoying a catalog of architecture. Click to enlarge (Courtesy of the Stephen Wiltshire Gallery)

During his time at Queensmill, Stephen’s instructors discovered that he had an extraordinary gift: he was able to reproduce extremely intricate sketches after seeing an image only once.

As an adult, Stephen used this skill to jump-start his career as an architectural artist by flying over massive cities and then reproducing huge, elaborate sketches of the cities, down to the number of windows in each building and the clothes on clothing lines.

I’ve gathered a few videos showcasing his mind-blowing talent. Enjoy!

Stephen draws New York City for UBS’s “We Will Not Rest” campaign in 2011:

Stephen draws Rome after flying over it for the first time:

Stephen draws Singapore after a helicopter fly-over (time-lapse):

Stephen takes on his largest ever panoramic drawing: a nearly 360 degree image of Tokyo:

Stephen is what is known as an autistic savant. Autistic savants have damage to the left anterior lobe of the brain, which plays a key role in processing sensory input and forming memories.

Because of this, they are able to access lower-level information like the extremely intricate details of buildings in Stephen’s works of art.

This information actually exists in all of our brains, but it’s normally unavailable to our conscious awareness because our brains classify this information as superfluous or non-essential.

However, studies and controversial experiments have proved that we can tap into these same talents by using transcranial magnetic stimulation: temporarily shutting down parts of the left anterior lobe using magnets.

Check out the video below to see how it effected creativity and other brain functions in the fascinating video below:

To view more of Stephen’s work and learn more about his life, you can visit his website, The Stephen Wiltshire Gallery.

12 Pieces of Street Art That Seamlessly Mesh With the Nature Around Them (Photo Gallery)

Street art is one of the more creative art forms around today. Because of its visibility, it is often used to make political or social statements, like the street art that emerged in Brazil before and during the World Cup.

But some street artists like to use their work to bring out parts of the natural environment that we might otherwise take for granted. Check out some of the best examples below (click an image to enlarge):

(h/t Bored Panda)

If These Photos of Dogs Underwater Don’t Make You Smile, Nothing Will (Photo Gallery)

Seth Casteel is a photographer based out of Chicago and Los Angeles who specializes in taking pictures of animals.

Though he photographs all types of animals, dogs are one of his favorite subjects. A few years back, he shot a series of photos of dogs playing underwater. Check out the pictures below (click an image to enlarge):

The success of the photos landed him a book deal, and the photo-book “Underwater Dogs” was released in October of 2012.

Casteel’s photography company, Little Friend’s Photography, specializes in lifestyle pet photography. Casteel describes this art form as,

“embracing the at-ease mentality of pets on location in the natural surroundings.”

You can check out more of Casteel’s work on Little Friend’s Photography’s website here.

(h/t CBS News)

This Guy’s Art Looks Like A Bunch of Trash… Until You See It From the Right Angle (GIFs and Gallery)

Bernard Pras is a French painter, photographer and sculptor with an amazing eye for perspective.

His art style in called anamorposis. It involves creating a distorted projection that can only be correctly viewed from one specific angle. Pras is a master, using all kinds of random odds and ends to create images with stunning detail.

Pras built the piece below as a memorial to Malian actor Sotigui Kouyaté (who played a major role in building a bridge between African and western culture) after he passed away in 2005.

He used clothes, paint, wood, rubber, and a number of other random objects that he scavenged from the installation site.

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Some close ups:

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Here’s another example of one of his pieces photographed from two different angles (it’s a portrait of famous surrealist painter Salvador Dali):

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And another…

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Check out more of Pras’s work below. Click an image to enlarge.

You can view all of Pras’s gallery on his website here.

(h/t ThisIsCollosal and Inspiration Green)