Tag Archives: lions

Should People Be Outraged By A Texas Tech Cheerleader Hunting Big Game In Africa? (Poll)

Don’t forget to voice your opinion by answering the poll questions at the end!

Kendall Jones is a 19-year-old from Cleburne, Texas, a small town about 45 minutes southwest of Dallas. When she was nine, she started following her father on his big game hunts in Africa.

Kendall quickly took a liking to the hunts, and at the age of 13, she shot her first animal: a White Rhino. From her Facebook:

“Although I had many other opportunities to shoot animals I wanted to save it for the Big 5, so the first animal I ever shot was a White Rhino with a .416 Remington!!”

Kendall poses with her White Rhino. Click to enlarge

The Big 5 Kendall mentions refers to the five African animals coveted most by hunters: the rhino, the elephant, the Cape buffalo, the leopard and the lion.

Since then, she has checked off the other four, as you can see in the pictures below.

Kendall with a Cape buffalo. Click to enlarge
Kendall, who describes her hunts as “fair chases”, with the near threatened African leopard. Click to enlarge
Kendall poses with a male lion. Click to enlarge
When this photo of Kendall with a large bull elephant sparked outrage, she defended herself by pointing out that the meat helped feed hundreds of families. Click to enlarge

Kendall’s “About” section on her Facebook page says that she’s, “looking to host a tv show in January 2015” about her hunting adventures through Africa.

Ironically, she has gained the public spotlight because of a recent online petition that has asked Facebook to, “Remove the page of Kendall Jones that promotes animal cruelty!” The petition, posted just over a week ago, has already garnered over 45,000 signatures (its goal is 50,000).

Another petition, posted to the website change.org a few days later, calls her out for using her hunting to expand her social media influence and adavance her entertainment career and asks that she be banned from hunting in Africa completely. It has nearly 3,500 signatures.

Kendall with a white springbok. She captioned this photo: “Another harvest for today. White springbok, it’s 1 of the 4 color shades of this animal! And let me tell you it’s one of my favorite kinds of meat so far!”

In her defense, Kendall argues that her hunting is about conservation. She writes,

“Controlling the male lion population is important within large fenced areas like these… Funds from a hunt like this goes partially to the government for permits but also to the farm owner as an incentive to keep and raise lions on their property.”

So while many may find what she’s doing distasteful, it’s actually not illegal. Big game hunters pay the government’s of African countries for special permits which allow them to hunt the animals.

These permits are often auctioned off, with a large portion of the proceeds supposedly going to help wildlife conservation efforts in the region. I say “supposedly” because anyone who knows Africa knows that a lot of money never gets where it’s supposed to go.

One of the biggest problems with illegal poaching is that many wildlife agents, customs officials, and government leaders are already being paid-off by wealthy and powerful mafia-style poaching rings, so it would be extremely surprising if this corruption doesn’t also exist in the extremely lucrative permit auctions.

Satao, one of the world’s most iconic elephants who was recently poached for his massive tusks. Click this image to read that story

Personally, I think killing any animal (especially one as rare and majestic as the great beasts of Africa) so you can pose with it for social media attention is a pretty selfish thing to do. Sure, certain populations (like feral hogs in Texas, for example) do a lot of damage to the environment and ought to be controlled.

And I don’t think there’s anything wrong with people wanting to document their kills for themselves, but parading the dead bodies of some of our most threatened species doesn’t send a message of conservation and protection, in my opinion.

However, as I said earlier, it’s perfectly legal. And I’m not sure whether people being offended by the pictures is a good enough reason to remove them from Facebook (which is full of offensive content), let alone ban her from Africa.

Let me know what you think by answering the three poll questions below.

Read the original story from the Daily Mail here.

If you’re interested in knowing just how threatened these different animal species are, you can look them up on World Wildlife Federation’s Endangered Species Directory.

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The Lion Whisperer Plays Soccer With Some of His Majestic Furry Friends (Video)

Kevin Richardson is a zoologist and conservationist who works with orphaned lions in the southern parts of Africa. Kevin takes in orphaned cubs, raises them to adulthood and then releases them back into national parks and game preserves where they are protected.

Kevin uses the amazing bond he has with these lions to promote awareness of their declining numbers by making mind-blowing videos of him interacting with the animals as if he were one of them.

Most recently he released the video above in conjunction with Van Gils, the official tailor of the Dutch national soccer team, whose mascot is a lion.

If you enjoyed this clip, make sure to check out this video that we posted in January, where Richardson takes a bunch of GoPro cameras with him while visiting his lion companions and a pack of hyenas who he has befriended as well.

WOW. The Man Who Hugs Wild Lions Brought a Go-Pro This Time (Video)

Kevin Richardson is known as the lion whisperer, and I think that term is perfectly accurate. He has literally made himself part of a pride of lions, as well as a group of hyenas.

Watch Kevin hug, cuddle and play with these wild predators. He also attaches Go-Pros on the backs of some of the lions and hyenas, so you can see things from their perspective as well.

If this isn’t the most amazing intimate footage of lions and hyenas you’ve ever seen, I’d be very surprised.

So This Guy Mounted a Camera On a Robot and Drove It Into a Group of Lions… (Video)

Epic idea. The stills from the buggy cam are at the end of the video.

The wild population of lions has been steadily falling. There are only about 20,000 left today, down from 400,000 in 1960. Some even predict that lions could be extinct in 10 to 15 years without drastic intervention.