Tag Archives: shark

Check Out This Rare Baby Albino “Cyclops” Shark (Photo Gallery)

I’ll address all skeptics immediately, this is a real dusky shark fetus that was caught inside its mother in 2011 along with nine other normal baby sharks. Unfortunately the mother died when it was caught so none of the babies survived.

In 2011,Tracy Ehrenberg, general manager of Pisces Sportfishing in Cabo San Lucas, interviewed the fisherman who made the catch in the Sea of Cortez, southeast of La Paz, Mexico.

With so many shark species struggling to survive because of the shark finning industry, it’s unfortunate to lose a mother shark with ten offspring. However, Ehrenberg points out,

“It’s kind of sad to see a female with pups inside killed but this was taken by a commercial fishing skiff and this is how this fisherman makes his living. All parts of the shark are used, including the skin. The meat is salted and sent to mainland Mexico, where it is usually sold as bacalo or ‘cod.'”

Shark with Litter
Shark with Litter

When pictures of the shark first emerged online, the images went viral and skeptics all over declined the possibility of this being a real catch. Even the fisherman who made the catch was amazed, and to this day keeps the fish in preservation and refuses to sell it.

The story became more believable after Felipe Galvan, a prominent Mexican scientist, acknowledged that he had inspected the shark and wrote a paper describing the fish’s strange appearance as the result of,

“a rare congenital malformation, resulting from the division of the embryonic brain that leads to fusion of the eyes to form a single, central eye.”

This fish is certainly one of the strangest creatures I have ever seen. Check out more pictures below. Click an image to enlarge:

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Did Something Just Eat A Great White Skark Off The Coast Of Australia? (Video)

The discovery came from Australia’s first ever large-scale tagging and tracking program for great white sharks.  Lead by filmmaker Dave Riggs and a film crew, the team successfully tagged a 9-foot bluechip specimen and named her “Shark Alpha”.

Four months later the tag was mysteriously found washed up on the beach. When the data was collected from the tracker, Riggs was stunned. According to Yahoo.com,

“Alpha had plunged straight down the side of the continental shelf, more than 1,500 feet deep. While the temperature of ocean water drops considerably in deep water, the tag itself actually heated up, from 46 degrees Fahrenheit to 78 degrees. That means the tag had to have been inside the belly of another animal. Alpha had been attacked, and bested, but by what?”

The story is chronicled in the upcoming Smithsonian documentary, “Hunt for the Super Predator.”  which can be viewed below.

Of course after the story surfaced on the internet, theorists from all over gave their best guesses as to what could’ve happened- some based in fact (like an Orca or giant squid), others in fantasy (like the Kraken).

So what did eat this 9-foot great white? Well, the most likely answer is that Alpha was eaten by another member of her own species, or as the scientists called it, a “colossal cannibal great white shark”.

This wouldn’t be too surprising: the average adult great white is between 13-16 feet in length, with some monsters growing up to 20+ feet. Great whites are also known to be aggressively territorial, and a bleeding, injured shark, even a great white, wouldn’t last long in waters full of other sharks

No matter what actually happened to this 9-foot great white, I don’t think that I’ll be swimming in Australia anytime soon…

People Kill More Than 11,400 Sharks EVERY HOUR (Infographic)

A recent paper published by the scientific journal Marine Policy estimated that 100 million sharks are killed per year (the paper said the number could be as high as 270 million).

If you’re wondering, sharks kill about 12 people per year.

The main culprit is the black market for shark fins in China and the surrounding territories, where shark fin soup is a delicacy and shark fins are often believed to have mystical healing powers.

Photo: reefs.com
Photo: reefs.com

Most “finned” sharks are thrown back into the ocean, where they are unable to properly maneuver. They either sink to the ocean floor and suffocate or are eaten by other predators.

If you break down 100 million annual deaths, it gives you about 11,417 sharks killed every hour (more than 190 sharks every minute).

This infographic from Joe Chernov and Robin Richards at Adventure Journal illustrates these staggering numbers better than any words ever could. (Click to enlarge)

Read more from The Huffington Post here. Also, check out this chart showing the countries that export the most shark fins to Hong Kong.

New Species of Hammerhead Shark Discovered Off Carolina Coast

Known officially as Sphyrna gilberti, the Carolina hammerhead was accidentally discovered when researchers from the University of South Carolina were collecting specimens of a related species, the scalloped hammerhead (Sphyrna lewini); upon examining their specimens, they realized that there were two distinct genetic signatures in the sharks they had collected, meaning that they were separate species. The main difference was that the Carolina hammerhead had 10 fewer vertebrae than its scalloped cousin.

The sharks can grown up to 4 meters, are grey to brown in color and are not aggressive. The numbers of scalloped hammerheads off the east coast has dropped 90% in the past few decades; this means that the number of Carolina hammerheads, which share the same environment but are much more rare than the scalloped hammerheads, is critically low.